Bombing Them Back to the Stone Age

From Holden:

Dahr Jamail writes in Mother Jones about the use of air power in Iraq, which has contributed to the fact that a full 60% of civilian casualties in Iraq have been caused by coalition forces.

With its ground troops stretched thin and growing haggard — 30% of them, after all, are already on their second tour of duty in the brutal occupation of Iraq – U.S. military commanders appear to be relying more than ever on airpower to give themselves an edge. The November assault on Fallujah did not even begin until warplanes had, on a near-daily basis, dropped 500-1000 pound bombs on suspected resistance targets in the besieged city. During that period, fighter jets ripped through the air over Baghdad for nights on end, heading out on mission after mission to drop their payloads on Fallujah.

[snip]

“The first day of Ramadan we went to the prayers and, just as the Imam said Allahu Akbar (“God is great”), the jets began to arrive.” Abu Hammad was remembering the early stages of the November Fallujah campaign. “They came continuously through the night and bombed everywhere in Fallujah. It did not stop even for a moment.”

The 35 year-old merchant is now a refugee living in a tent on the campus of the University of Baghdad along with over 900 other homeless Fallujans. “If the American forces did not find a target to bomb,” he said, “they used sound bombs just to terrorize the people and children. The city stayed in fear; I cannot give you a picture of how panicked everyone was.” As he spoke in a strained voice, his body began to tremble with the memories, “In the morning, I found Fallujah empty, as if nobody lived in it. It felt as though Fallujah had already been bombed to the ground. As if nothing were left.”

[snip]

Throughout much of urban Iraq, people tell stories of being terrorized by American airpower, often which is often loosed on heavily populated neighborhoods that have, in effect, been declared the bombing equivalents of free-fire zones.

“There is no limit to the American aggression,” comments a sheikh from Baquba, a city 30 miles northeast of the capital. He agreed to discuss the subject of air power only on the condition of anonymity, fearing reprisals from the U.S. military.

“The fighter jets regularly fly so low over our city that you can see the pilots sitting in the cockpit,” he tells me, using his hand to measure the skyline and indicate just how low he means. “The helicopters fly even lower, so low, and aim their guns at the people and this terrifies everyone. How can humans live like this? Even our animals, the chickens and sheep are frightened by this. We don’t know why they do this to us.”

[snip]

“Why do the Americans bomb all of us in our homes,” asked Ahmed as our interview was ending. And you could feel his puzzlement. “Even those of us who do not fight, we are suffering so much because of the U.S. bombs and tanks. Can’t they see this is turning so many people against them?”

[snip]

Burhan Fasa’a, a gaunt 33 year-old journalist is a cameraman for the Lebanese Broadcasting Company. He was inside the city during the first eight days of the November assault. “I saw at least 200 families whose homes had collapsed on them, thanks to American bombs,” he said. “I saw a huge number of people killed in the northern part of the city and most of them were civilians.”

Like so many others I’ve talked with who made it out of Fallujah, he described scenes of widespread death and desolation in what had not so long before been a modest-sized city. Most of these resulted from bombings that – despite official announcements emphasizing how “targeted” and “precise” they were – seemed to those on the receiving end unbearably indiscriminate.

Read on and you will find eye-witness accounts of the use of cluster bombs and chemical weapons in the November assault on Fallujah, further evidence of American war crimes in Iraq.