How We Lost The War

From Holden:

Maj. Isaiah Wilson, the official historian of the U.S. Army for the War on Iraq, says that the U.S. military “lost its dominance” in Iraq way back in July of ’03, characterizes the performance of the U.S. military in Iraq as “mediocre”, and adds that we are well on our way to losing the war.

The U.S. military lost its dominance in Iraq shortly after its invasion in 2003, a study concluded.

A report by the U.S. Army official historian said the military was hampered by the failure to occupy and stabilize Iraq in 2003. As a result, the military lost its dominance by July 2003 and has yet to regain that position.

“In the two to three months of ambiguous transition, U.S. forces slowly lost the momentum and the initiative gained over an off-balanced enemy,” the report said. “The United States, its Army and its coalition of the willing have been playing catch-up ever since.”

[snip]

Wilson said army planners failed to understand or accept the prospect that Iraqis would resist the U.S. forces after the fall of the Saddam regime. He deemed the military performance in Iraq mediocre and said the army could lose the war.

“U.S. war planners, practitioners and the civilian leadership conceived of the war far too narrowly,” the report said. “This overly simplistic conception of the war led to a cascading undercutting of the war effort: too few troops, too little coordination with civilian and governmental/non-governmental agencies and too little allotted time to achieve success.”