There’s Always Somebody Ruining the Fun for the Rest of Us

Lady, if you don’t want him, we’ll take him:

Rick likes that he can be there for their 7-year-old daughter, but
Eleanor says, “I don’t like coming home and seeing him in my apron.”
Eleanor says she doesn’t know if she can learn to respect her husband
if he can’t find a job because, “that’s one of the basic things that
little girls grow up thinking, that the man is going to put a roof over
her head he’s going to support the family.”

All sexist crap aside, what the hell is going on? There are places to go for sensitive discussion of the erosion of traditional gender roles in our society and the effects on people’s marriages, especially during times of economic upset, but Good Morning America wouldn’t be on my top ten list of them.

Modern American Journalism: Like marriage counseling, in a way.

Stories like this always amuse me — and by amuse I mean enrage — with their total ignorance of any kind of history at all. World War II, anybody? Great Depression? I mean, this movie came out in 198FUCKING3, but leave it to GMA to act like the world began yesterday just because they noticed a really big bang.

A.

13 thoughts on “There’s Always Somebody Ruining the Fun for the Rest of Us

  1. Lowest point of the clip:
    [voice over: this sort of thing will totally damage your kids]
    reporter: hey seven-year-old, why don’t you tell us on national television how much your parents hate each other now?

  2. “that’s one of the basic things that little girls grow up thinking, that the man is going to put a roof over her head he’s going to support the family.”
    Howold are you, lady? I grew up in the 1970s raised by a woman who’d come of age in the 1950s, andI never got taught that. Didn’t, um, thefeminist movement have trenchant and salient things to say aboutwomen being financially dependent on men andhow bad an idea that really is like…not too long ago…relative to the age of the feminist movement…like back in thefreakin’ 1920s?!?!
    I dunno where she grew up, but in my world, menleave, much more frequently than job skills do…
    Sheesh…

  3. What a bunch of CRAP! And you know what pisses me off? How much those retro attitudes hurt men too? My brother was in a situation where he was a home with the kids and it should have been a GREAT time, but it was frowned upon.
    I understand it, I was the first feminist in my very traditional family and I fought for women’s rights from a selfish point of view. Smart, happy working women are good for the country.
    One thing I like about super nanny is the way that she trains the men to spend time with the kids. It’s kind of sad that in this day and age that she still has to do that, but it is because of old fashion gender roles (and fundamentalism) they don’t know.
    I don’t think it is cute anymore to see hilarious shots of the dad not knowing how to cook, clean or discipline their kids. You are an adult and a parent, it was your choice to have kids and unless you are living in a time warp part of the deal is that you are involved.

  4. I don’t think it is cute anymore to see hilarious shots of the dad not knowing how to cook, clean or discipline their kids.
    This is why I cannot watch sitcoms anymore. I know so many smart, capable dads who are good parents that watching somebody deliberately be an ignorant, irresponsible fuck is just maddening.
    A.

  5. Damn, if that’s her problem, why doesn’t he just get his own apron.
    The antediluvian mindset is that cooking is women’s work, unless it’s for big bucks (or involves cooking meat with fire), and then it’s men’s work.
    Someone on TV is antediluvian …

  6. but Eleanor says, “I don’t like coming home and seeing him in my bra and panties.”
    There. Fixed that for you.

  7. I suggest he make it all better by giving her a washing machine for her birthday. Can’t have it both ways, honey.

  8. When my wife and I learned that our twins had severe developmental issues, I quit my job and spent the next four years at home.
    Societal conditioning is pervasive; my wife and I made the decision jointly, we had children that absolutely required a stay at home parent, and I was busier and more stressed than I ever had been at work.
    And sometimes I still felt like a bum because I wasn’t employed.
    MN

  9. From our son L.’s birth to kindergarten my fabulous husband (whose bday is today: better than ever at 44!) was home with him during the day and worked nights; we were both pretty exhausted by the split shift, but I cannot tell you how great it is to have a son who has spent as much time with his dad as his mom. My relationship with L. is better for it because he didn’t grow up with me being the sole mom/nag, and his relationship with his dad is better for it because they actually had to deal with each other on the nagging little drive-you-nuts everyday things – and they got to share many of the little wonders that kids experience every day before they start school.
    Though we both work days now, my wonderful husband still does the laundry and most of the housekeeping (I cook, fold, buy groceries, sew, mend and iron).
    Eleanor, you have no idea what you are turning your nose up at; I cannot measure the value of not being the only one your kid turns to when a booboo needs to be kissed or a butt or nose needs to be wiped. (L. is 10 now, so we’re mostly past that, but you get the idea.)
    If Eleanor doesn’t recognize her embarrassment of riches, I’m sure some other woman will very soon…

  10. This guy definitely deserves a better wife, and this kid a better mom.

Comments are closed.