The Internet Keeps Journalism Alive

People, too, in some cases:

As the streets exploded with violence, one Maputo resident (@BarataJorge)
observed that few local broadcasters were relaying information. “Demonstrations
inMaputo.
RadioMozambique,
just music, TV pass math class.News just inRTP Africa andSTV.” Paul Fauvet, English service editor
of Mozambique’s state news agencyAIM,
shared in an e-mail that the unrest disrupted the operations of some print
media outlets. “The riots did close down the independent faxed dailyMediafax, which has not appeared for the
last two days, because key people in the distribution were unable to reach the
office. The daily paperNoticiasappeared
in its online version, but could not be distributed on the streets,” he wrote.Jornal a Verdade,
a free weekly newspaper in Maputo overcame the logistical problems
by
using itswebsite andFacebookfan page to postdozens
of articles and videos in Portuguese.The paper’s
editor, Erik Charas, was
one of the first journalists to disseminate news of the crisis in English, helping
to turn this local event into an international news story. Charas integrated an
Ushahidi crisis reporting tool
on the paper’s website and used his tweeter feed (@echaras) to post updates, crafting
an English hashtag:#maputoriots.

Journalists who dismiss Twitter and other tools as useless to journalism just haven’t found the appropriate uses to which they can be put.

A.

One thought on “The Internet Keeps Journalism Alive

  1. virgotex says:

    Journalists who dismiss Twitter and other tools as useless to journalism just haven’t found the appropriate uses to which they can be put.

    Which is kind of what Mac McClelland also said re her work in the Gulf.

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