Monthly Archives: March 2014

ADHD is Over-Diagnosed and Over-Medicated, Which is the Fault of … Ladies

Not pharmaceutical companies, not overloaded and under-educated doctors, not even school administrators’ zero-tolerance policies or the general paranoid parenting culture. Nope. It’s all about women:

“We are pathologizing boyhood,” says Ned Hallowell, a psychiatrist who has been diagnosed with ADHD himself and has cowritten two books about it, Driven to Distractionand Delivered from Distraction. “God bless the women’s movement—we needed it—but what’s happened is, particularly in schools where most of the teachers are women, there’s been a general girlification of elementary school, where any kind of disruptive behavior is sinful. What I call the ‘moral diagnosis’ gets made: You’re bad. Now go get a doctor and get on medication so you’ll be good. And that’s a real perversion of what ought to happen. Most boys are naturally more restless than most girls, and I would say that’s good. But schools want these little goody-goodies who sit still and do what they’re told—these robots—and that’s just not who boys are.”

Is there anything feminism hasn’t destroyed?

The article in which this guy opens his cakehole is actually very interesting, in its outlining of the history of the drugs most commonly used to treat ADHD and the history of the diagnosis itself, but this fellow is the first “expert” quoted. And he lays the blame directly at the feet of female teachers who just can’t handle the exuberance of real men.

Or maybe this has something to do with it, too:

And there are other underlying reasons for the recent explosion in diagnoses. Stephen Hinshaw, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley and the editor of Psychological Bulletin, the research publication of the American Psychological Association, presents evidence in a new book that ADHD diagnoses can vary widely according to demographics and even education policy, which could account for why some states see a rate of 4 percent of schoolchildren with ADHD while others see a rate of almost 15 percent. Most shocking is Hinshaw’s examination of the implications of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which gave incentives to states whose students scored well on standardized tests. The result: “Such laws provide real incentive to have children diagnosed and treated.” Children with ADHD often get more time to take tests, and in some school districts, tests taken by ADHD kids do not even have to be included in the overall average. “That is, an ADHD diagnosis might exempt a low-achieving youth from lowering the district’s overall achievement ranking”—thus ensuring that the district not incur federal sanctions for low scores.

A.

Slut Shaming the Scapegoat, Jersey Style

It has been quite some time since I wrote about Governor Assholeand his legal and political problems. It’s the way of scandals: they ebb and flow. The shit storm is starting to flow again in the GW Bridge Too Far scandal. This time Christie’s wounds are self inflicted.

Does anyone take this “investigation” seriously? It’s really more of a defense brief in investigatory drag and it’s about as attractive as Chris Christie in a bustier, stockings, and stilettos. Sorry for searing that image into your brains but he deserves a bit of slut shaming after the shamelessly shameful way his mouthpiece Randy Mastro baited Bridget Kelly in the report. I think Joan Walsh nailed it:

Randy Mastro’s report put the blame squarely on two fired staffers, David Wildstein and deputy chief of staff Bridget Kelly. But its treatment of Kelly was mind-blowingly mean, describing her as “emotional,” “erratic” and as a liar; confirming Trenton gossip that she was “personally involved” with chief of staff Bill Stepien, and that Stepien apparently dumped her; alleging that she asked an aide to delete an incriminating email when the investigation began, thus implicating her not only in the plot’s execution but its coverup.

The hilarious thing about the Mastro report, other than his punworthy names, is the way it purports to read Ms. Kelly’s mind. She wisely declined to be interviewed. The implication is that she got all hormonal and took it out on Jersey drivers. Everyone has had bad breakups but few get jilted and cause traffic jams. Obviously, the fact that Bridget Kelly has a vagina is the reason that the saintly Governor of New Jersey is in the mess he’s in…

I had the displeasure of watching Governor Fat Fuck’s Friday presser wherein he preened, strutted, bragged, and bullied his way to so-called redemption. In between insulting reporters like a latter day Fat Jack E Leonard, Christie told a couple of whoppers. My personal favorite was when he claimed he didn’t know if he was invited to kiss Sheldon Adelson’s ass in Vegas. As we all know, he was a participant in the Sheldon primary, grovelled to the gambling mogul, and then apologized for using the term “occupied territories” in a way that offended Likudnik and right wing sensibilities. Christie is a classic bully: he kisses UP and kicks DOWN.

As a satirist, I am thrilled that Governor Kramden has his arrogant mojo back and plans to go through with his plan to insult pig farmers in Iowa and maple syrup producers in New Hampshire. I cannot wait to see him interact with the notoriously prickly voters in NH, if, that is, he survives all the investigations coming after him. He’s already alienated at least 3 of his former aides (Kelly, Wildstein and Stepien) and seems to be losing the Wall Street primary to Jeb Bush. That’s right, W’s brother, the allegedly smart one. Not a lot of competition for that title among Bar and Poppy’s dim brood…

Finally, Christie’s funniest defense of the Mastro report is that the mouthpiece’s law firm is full of former prosecutors and they would never lie. That’s particularly ironic to a New Orleanian who is watching the US attorney commenting scandal unfold in a manner that’s reversing convictions and disgracing former US Attorney Jim Letten. Lensman Mark (Oyster) Moseley has been all over that scandal like a cheap suit, which seems to be growing like kudzu, sort of like the GW Bridge Too Far scandal.

That is all, anything else would be Mastrobation…

Slut Shaming the Scapegoat, Jersey Style

It has been quite some time since I wrote about Governor Assholeand his legal and political problems. It’s the way of scandals: they ebb and flow. The shit storm is starting to flow again in the GW Bridge Too Far scandal. This time Christie’s wounds are self inflicted.

Does anyone take this “investigation” seriously? It’s really more of a defense brief in investigatory drag and it’s about as attractive as Chris Christie in a bustier, stockings, and stilettos. Sorry for searing that image into your brains but he deserves a bit of slut shaming after the shamelessly shameful way his mouthpiece Randy Mastro baited Bridget Kelly in the report. I think Joan Walsh nailed it:

Randy Mastro’s report put the blame squarely on two fired staffers, David Wildstein and deputy chief of staff Bridget Kelly. But its treatment of Kelly was mind-blowingly mean, describing her as “emotional,” “erratic” and as a liar; confirming Trenton gossip that she was “personally involved” with chief of staff Bill Stepien, and that Stepien apparently dumped her; alleging that she asked an aide to delete an incriminating email when the investigation began, thus implicating her not only in the plot’s execution but its coverup.

The hilarious thing about the Mastro report, other than his punworthy names, is the way it purports to read Ms. Kelly’s mind. She wisely declined to be interviewed. The implication is that she got all hormonal and took it out on Jersey drivers. Everyone has had bad breakups but few get jilted and cause traffic jams. Obviously, the fact that Bridget Kelly has a vagina is the reason that the saintly Governor of New Jersey is in the mess he’s in…

I had the displeasure of watching Governor Fat Fuck’s Friday presser wherein he preened, strutted, bragged, and bullied his way to so-called redemption. In between insulting reporters like a latter day Fat Jack E Leonard, Christie told a couple of whoppers. My personal favorite was when he claimed he didn’t know if he was invited to kiss Sheldon Adelson’s ass in Vegas. As we all know, he was a participant in the Sheldon primary, grovelled to the gambling mogul, and then apologized for using the term “occupied territories” in a way that offended Likudnik and right wing sensibilities. Christie is a classic bully: he kisses UP and kicks DOWN.

As a satirist, I am thrilled that Governor Kramden has his arrogant mojo back and plans to go through with his plan to insult pig farmers in Iowa and maple syrup producers in New Hampshire. I cannot wait to see him interact with the notoriously prickly voters in NH, if, that is, he survives all the investigations coming after him. He’s already alienated at least 3 of his former aides (Kelly, Wildstein and Stepien) and seems to be losing the Wall Street primary to Jeb Bush. That’s right, W’s brother, the allegedly smart one. Not a lot of competition for that title among Bar and Poppy’s dim brood…

Finally, Christie’s funniest defense of the Mastro report is that the mouthpiece’s law firm is full of former prosecutors and they would never lie. That’s particularly ironic to a New Orleanian who is watching the US attorney commenting scandal unfold in a manner that’s reversing convictions and disgracing former US Attorney Jim Letten. Lensman Mark (Oyster) Moseley has been all over that scandal like a cheap suit, which seems to be growing like kudzu, sort of like the GW Bridge Too Far scandal.

That is all, anything else would be Mastrobation…

Slut Shaming the Scapegoat, Jersey Style

It has been quite some time since I wrote about Governor Assholeand his legal and political problems. It’s the way of scandals: they ebb and flow. The shit storm is starting to flow again in the GW Bridge Too Far scandal. This time Christie’s wounds are self inflicted.

Does anyone take this “investigation” seriously? It’s really more of a defense brief in investigatory drag and it’s about as attractive as Chris Christie in a bustier, stockings, and stilettos. Sorry for searing that image into your brains but he deserves a bit of slut shaming after the shamelessly shameful way his mouthpiece Randy Mastro baited Bridget Kelly in the report. I think Joan Walsh nailed it:

Randy Mastro’s report put the blame squarely on two fired staffers, David Wildstein and deputy chief of staff Bridget Kelly. But its treatment of Kelly was mind-blowingly mean, describing her as “emotional,” “erratic” and as a liar; confirming Trenton gossip that she was “personally involved” with chief of staff Bill Stepien, and that Stepien apparently dumped her; alleging that she asked an aide to delete an incriminating email when the investigation began, thus implicating her not only in the plot’s execution but its coverup.

The hilarious thing about the Mastro report, other than his punworthy names, is the way it purports to read Ms. Kelly’s mind. She wisely declined to be interviewed. The implication is that she got all hormonal and took it out on Jersey drivers. Everyone has had bad breakups but few get jilted and cause traffic jams. Obviously, the fact that Bridget Kelly has a vagina is the reason that the saintly Governor of New Jersey is in the mess he’s in…

I had the displeasure of watching Governor Fat Fuck’s Friday presser wherein he preened, strutted, bragged, and bullied his way to so-called redemption. In between insulting reporters like a latter day Fat Jack E Leonard, Christie told a couple of whoppers. My personal favorite was when he claimed he didn’t know if he was invited to kiss Sheldon Adelson’s ass in Vegas. As we all know, he was a participant in the Sheldon primary, grovelled to the gambling mogul, and then apologized for using the term “occupied territories” in a way that offended Likudnik and right wing sensibilities. Christie is a classic bully: he kisses UP and kicks DOWN.

As a satirist, I am thrilled that Governor Kramden has his arrogant mojo back and plans to go through with his plan to insult pig farmers in Iowa and maple syrup producers in New Hampshire. I cannot wait to see him interact with the notoriously prickly voters in NH, if, that is, he survives all the investigations coming after him. He’s already alienated at least 3 of his former aides (Kelly, Wildstein and Stepien) and seems to be losing the Wall Street primary to Jeb Bush. That’s right, W’s brother, the allegedly smart one. Not a lot of competition for that title among Bar and Poppy’s dim brood…

Finally, Christie’s funniest defense of the Mastro report is that the mouthpiece’s law firm is full of former prosecutors and they would never lie. That’s particularly ironic to a New Orleanian who is watching the US attorney commenting scandal unfold in a manner that’s reversing convictions and disgracing former US Attorney Jim Letten. Lensman Mark (Oyster) Moseley has been all over that scandal like a cheap suit, which seems to be growing like kudzu, sort of like the GW Bridge Too Far scandal.

That is all, anything else would be Mastrobation…

Slut Shaming the Scapegoat, Jersey Style

It has been quite some time since I wrote about Governor Assholeand his legal and political problems. It’s the way of scandals: they ebb and flow. The shit storm is starting to flow again in the GW Bridge Too Far scandal. This time Christie’s wounds are self inflicted.

Does anyone take this “investigation” seriously? It’s really more of a defense brief in investigatory drag and it’s about as attractive as Chris Christie in a bustier, stockings, and stilettos. Sorry for searing that image into your brains but he deserves a bit of slut shaming after the shamelessly shameful way his mouthpiece Randy Mastro baited Bridget Kelly in the report.I think Joan Walsh nailed it:

Randy Mastro’s report put the blame squarely on two fired staffers, David Wildstein and deputy chief of staff Bridget Kelly. But its treatment of Kelly was mind-blowingly mean, describing her as “emotional,” “erratic” and as a liar; confirming Trenton gossip that she was “personally involved” with chief of staff Bill Stepien, and that Stepien apparently dumped her; alleging that she asked an aide to delete an incriminating email when the investigation began, thus implicating her not only in the plot’s execution but its coverup.

The hilarious thing about the Mastro report, other than his punworthy names, is the way it purports to read Ms. Kelly’s mind. She wisely declined to be interviewed. The implication is that she got all hormonal and took it out on Jersey drivers. Everyone has had bad breakups but few get jilted and cause traffic jams. Obviously, the fact that Bridget Kelly has a vagina is the reason that the saintly Governor of New Jersey is in the mess he’s in…

I had the displeasure of watching Governor Fat Fuck’s Friday presser wherein he preened, strutted, bragged, and bullied his way to so-called redemption. In between insulting reporters like a latter day Fat Jack E Leonard, Christie told a couple of whoppers. My personal favorite was when he claimed he didn’t know if he was invited to kiss Sheldon Adelson’s ass in Vegas. As we all know, he was a participant in the Sheldon primary, grovelled to the gambling mogul, and then apologized for using the term “occupied territories” in a way that offended Likudnik and right wing sensibilities. Christie is a classic bully: he kisses UP and kicks DOWN.

As a satirist, I am thrilled that Governor Kramden has his arrogant mojo back and plans to go through with his plan to insult pig farmers in Iowa and maple syrup producers in New Hampshire. I cannot wait to see him interact with the notoriously prickly voters in NH, if, that is, he survives all the investigations coming after him. He’s already alienated at least 3 of his former aides (Kelly, Wildstein and Stepien) and seems to be losing the Wall Street primary to Jeb Bush. That’s right, W’s brother, the allegedly smart one. Not a lot of competition for that title among Bar and Poppy’s dim brood…

Finally, Christie’s funniest defense of the Mastro report is that the mouthpiece’s law firm is full of former prosecutors and they would never lie. That’s particularly ironic to a New Orleanian who is watching the US attorney commenting scandal unfold in a manner that’s reversing convictions and disgracing former US Attorney Jim Letten. Lensman Mark (Oyster) Moseley has been all over that scandal like a cheap suit, which seems to be growing like kudzu, sort of like the GW Bridge Too Far scandal.

That is all, anything else would be Mastrobation…

Slut Shaming the Scapegoat, Jersey Style

It has been quite some time since I wrote about Governor Assholeand his legal and political problems. It’s the way of scandals: they ebb and flow. The shit storm is starting to flow again in the GW Bridge Too Far scandal. This time Christie’s wounds are self inflicted.

Does anyone take this “investigation” seriously? It’s really more of a defense brief in investigatory drag and it’s about as attractive as Chris Christie in a bustier, stockings, and stilettos. Sorry for searing that image into your brains but he deserves a bit of slut shaming after the shamelessly shameful way his mouthpiece Randy Mastro baited Bridget Kelly in the report. I think Joan Walsh nailed it:

Randy Mastro’s report put the blame squarely on two fired staffers, David Wildstein and deputy chief of staff Bridget Kelly. But its treatment of Kelly was mind-blowingly mean, describing her as “emotional,” “erratic” and as a liar; confirming Trenton gossip that she was “personally involved” with chief of staff Bill Stepien, and that Stepien apparently dumped her; alleging that she asked an aide to delete an incriminating email when the investigation began, thus implicating her not only in the plot’s execution but its coverup.

The hilarious thing about the Mastro report, other than his punworthy names, is the way it purports to read Ms. Kelly’s mind. She wisely declined to be interviewed. The implication is that she got all hormonal and took it out on Jersey drivers. Everyone has had bad breakups but few get jilted and cause traffic jams. Obviously, the fact that Bridget Kelly has a vagina is the reason that the saintly Governor of New Jersey is in the mess he’s in…

I had the displeasure of watching Governor Fat Fuck’s Friday presser wherein he preened, strutted, bragged, and bullied his way to so-called redemption. In between insulting reporters like a latter day Fat Jack E Leonard, Christie told a couple of whoppers. My personal favorite was when he claimed he didn’t know if he was invited to kiss Sheldon Adelson’s ass in Vegas. As we all know, he was a participant in the Sheldon primary, grovelled to the gambling mogul, and then apologized for using the term “occupied territories” in a way that offended Likudnik and right wing sensibilities. Christie is a classic bully: he kisses UP and kicks DOWN.

As a satirist, I am thrilled that Governor Kramden has his arrogant mojo back and plans to go through with his plan to insult pig farmers in Iowa and maple syrup producers in New Hampshire. I cannot wait to see him interact with the notoriously prickly voters in NH, if, that is, he survives all the investigations coming after him. He’s already alienated at least 3 of his former aides (Kelly, Wildstein and Stepien) and seems to be losing the Wall Street primary to Jeb Bush. That’s right, W’s brother, the allegedly smart one. Not a lot of competition for that title among Bar and Poppy’s dim brood…

Finally, Christie’s funniest defense of the Mastro report is that the mouthpiece’s law firm is full of former prosecutors and they would never lie. That’s particularly ironic to a New Orleanian who is watching the US attorney commenting scandal unfold in a manner that’s reversing convictions and disgracing former US Attorney Jim Letten. Lensman Mark (Oyster) Moseley has been all over that scandal like a cheap suit, which seems to be growing like kudzu, sort of like the GW Bridge Too Far scandal.

That is all, anything else would be Mastrobation…

Weekend Question Thread

Because it seems we’re finally, finally, finally about to get a taste of spring here this weekend: What’s your favorite warm-weather activity?

I’m just looking forward to going out without needing to put on five layers.

A.

Weekend Question Thread

Because it seems we’re finally, finally, finally about to get a taste of spring here this weekend: What’s your favorite warm-weather activity?

I’m just looking forward to going out without needing to put on five layers.

A.

Weekend Question Thread

Because it seems we’re finally, finally, finally about to get a taste of spring here this weekend: What’s your favorite warm-weather activity?

I’m just looking forward to going out without needing to put on five layers.

A.

Weekend Question Thread

Because it seems we’re finally, finally, finally about to get a taste of spring here this weekend: What’s your favorite warm-weather activity?

I’m just looking forward to going out without needing to put on five layers.

A.

Weekend Question Thread

Because it seems we’re finally, finally, finally about to get a taste of spring here this weekend: What’s your favorite warm-weather activity?

I’m just looking forward to going out without needing to put on five layers.

A.

Weekend Question Thread

Because it seems we’re finally, finally, finally about to get a taste of spring here this weekend: What’s your favorite warm-weather activity?

I’m just looking forward to going out without needing to put on five layers.

A.

Today on Tommy T’s Obsession with the Freeperati – Putrid Pot-pourri edition

Good morning, gentle people – I’m kind of hoping the congresscritters will get off their dead asses and reauthorize EUIC, since it was all I had, and my benefits stopped in Janurary. Pulling the trigger early on Social Security may be my only recourse, but I don’t have to like it.

Well, enough public shirt-rending.

In the meantime, there’s this:

My Trip to the Pot Shop
Townhall.com ^ | March 26, 2014 | Michelle Malkin

Posted on 3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎6‎:‎01‎:‎42‎ ‎AM by Kaslin

PUEBLO WEST, Colo. — It’s 9 a.m. on a weekday, and I’m at the Marisol Therapeutics pot shop. This is serious business. Security is tight. ID checks are frequent. Merchandise is strictly regulated, labeled, wrapped and controlled. The store is clean, bright and safe. The staffers are courteous and professional. Customers of all ages are here.

There’s a middle-aged woman at the counter nearby who could be your school librarian. On the opposite end of the dispensary, a slender young soldier in a wheelchair with close-cropped hair, dressed in his fatigues, consults with a clerk. There’s a gregarious cowboy and an inquisitive pair of baby boomers looking at edibles. A dude in a hoodie walks in with his backpack.

And then there’s my husband and me.

(snip)

Before I tell you how and why my hubby and I ended up at Marisol Therapeutics, some background about my longtime support of medical marijuana: More than 15 years ago in Seattle, while working at The Seattle Times, I met an extraordinary man who changed my mind about the issue. Ralph Seeley was a Navy nuclear submarine officer, pilot, cellist and lawyer suffering from chordoma, a rare form of bone cancer that starts in the spine. He had undergone several surgeries, including removal of one lung and partial removal of the other, and was confined to a wheelchair.

Chronically nauseous from chemotherapy and radiation, weak from a suppressed appetite, and suffering excruciating pain, Seeley turned to marijuana cigarettes for relief.

Contrary to cultural stereotype, Seeley was far from “wasted.” While smoking the drug to reduce his pain, he finished law school — something he couldn’t have done while on far more powerful “mainstream” narcotics, which left him zonked out and vomiting uncontrollably in his hospital bed after chemo. Seeley had the backing of his orthopedic doctor and University of Washington School of Medicine oncologist Dr. Ernest Conrad. He took his plight to the Washington state supreme court, where he asserted a constitutionally protected liberty interest in having his doctor issue a medical pot prescription.

(snip)

This brings us back to Pueblo. For the past three months, my mother-in-law, Carole, whom I love with all my heart, has battled metastatic melanoma. After a harrowing week of hospitalization and radiation, she’s at home now. A miraculous new combination of oral cancer drugs seems to have helped enormously with pain and possibly contained the disease’s spread. But Carole’s loss of appetite and nausea persist.

A month ago, with encouragement from all of her doctors here in Colorado, she applied for a state-issued medical marijuana card. It still hasn’t come through. As a clerk at Marisol Therapeutics told us, there’s a huge backlog. But thanks to Amendment 64, the marijuana drug legalization act approved by voters in 2012, we were able to legally and safely circumvent the bureaucratic holdup. “A lot of people are in your same situation,” the pot shop staffer told us. “We see it all the time, and we’re glad we can help.”

Our stash included 10 pre-rolled joints, a “vape pen” and two containers of cheddar cheese-flavored marijuana crackers (they were out of brownies). So far, just one cracker a day is yielding health benefits. Carole is eating better than she has in three months. For us, there’s no greater joy than sharing the simple pleasure of gathering in the kitchen for a meal, with Grandma Carole at the head of the table.

Do I worry about the negative costs, abuses and cultural consequences of unbridled recreational pot use? Of course I do. But when you get past all the “Rocky Mountain High” jokes and look past all the cable-news caricatures, the legalized marijuana entrepreneurs here in my adopted home state are just like any other entrepreneurs: securing capital, paying taxes, complying with a thicket of regulations, taking risks and providing goods and services that ordinary people want and need. Including our grateful family.

1 posted on ‎3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎6‎:‎01‎:‎42‎ ‎AM by Kaslin

So – Michelle (Defeatocrat’s cheer) Malkin went to a dispensary. Imagine that.

I’ve always described Republicans as “A Democrat who hasn’t gotten their cancer diagnosis yet”, but this should be instructive – Freeperati-wise.

Every discussion about decriminalization I’ve ever seen in Freeperville has been about 9-1 in favour of killing the stoned hippies (the 1 being a Paulian or other flavour of Libertarian). Now, it’s one of their very own right-wing masturbatory fantasy women pimping the Devil Weed.

To: Kaslin

There should be a double emphasis that the author is MM herself!!!!!!!!!

The law abiding suffer while all the effort and money goes into beating up the dealers, producers, and users, to what end?

Ask the privatized prison-owners.

Please remember this article is about a single product that has nothing to do with narcotics trafficking.

It never had anything to do with narcotics trafficking. Opioids are narcotics. I can call a cat a dog if I want, but it still won’t bark.

A product by the way that is still a federal crime to possess.

Please notice also that the federal push back on state sovereignty seems to be focused on an illegal substance rather than the pursuit of God given rights.

Maybe that’s because (unlike freedom from religion) there is no reference to hemp in the Bill Of Rights?

On the one hand CO has legalized a federally prohibited product, and on the other cannot muster the proper vote on legislation that puts the fringe on “shall not be infringed”.

3 posted on ‎3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎6‎:‎22‎:‎37‎ ‎AM by wita

Deeply conflicting, no? The Damn Gummint shouldn’t be telling us what to do with our slaves weed, and still – on the other hand, hippies,

Oh my daughter, oh my ducats!

To: Kaslin

Truly tragic to see MM (who I admired greatly before this) support the Marxists effort to put the final nail in America’s coffin, by getting the population stoned on pot.

8 posted on 3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎6‎:‎47‎:‎12‎ ‎AM by Above My Pay Grade (The people have the right to tell government what guns it may possess, not the other way around.)
Aaaaand we’re OFF!!
To: Kaslin

The staffers are courteous and professional.”

…the guy pictured may be couteous but he looks exactly like what I’d expect to see in a dope shop. And “professional” ain’t it.

13 posted on ‎3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎6‎:‎54‎:‎34‎ ‎AM by albie
GOPimp
To: Above My Pay Grade
Truly tragic to see MM support the Marxists effort to put the final nail in America’s coffin, by getting the population stoned on pot.

Oh, please. Pot wasn’t even illegal until the 1920’s, so it has been legal longer than it has been illegal.

The article has nothing to do with MM supporting ‘getting stoned’ either, which you would notice if you’d read the article instead of knee-jerking into melodramatic swill mode.

17 posted on 3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎7‎:‎21‎:‎52‎ ‎AM by MamaTexan (I am a Person as created by the Laws of Nature, not a person as created by the laws of Man)
ClownSlapFight
Who else can the Freeperati smear with the rancid reefer references?
To: MamaTexan

>>>Oh, please. Pot wasn’t even illegal until the 1920’s, so it has been legal longer than it has been illegal.<<<

That was before America was a welfare state. If 47% percent are paying no taxes and 47 million are on food stamps now, wait 20 years. When half of the next generation of American children is raised by semi-conscious potheads and are abusing pot by the time they are 9 years old, 70% will be paying no taxes and there will be 100 million on food stamps (and weed stamps).

The only possible bright side is that the small minority of us who remain straight, sober and armed might be able to easily take back America from these hoards (sic) of brain dead sissies.

21 posted on 3‎/‎26‎/‎2014‎ ‎7‎:‎57‎:‎23‎ ‎AM by Above My Pay Grade (The people have the right to tell government what guns it may possess, not the other way around.)
Silly me. The “takers”. How could I have not seen that coming?
Waitaminnit – “weed stamps”?
Nobody tells me anything.
Anywhoo, would Michelle Malkin hold as much sway over the alleged minds of the Freeperati if she were, say, male and/or ugly?
Are her supporters thinking only with their auxilliary heads?
I was going to post TBogg’s favourite, the “Michelle Malkin defeatocrats’ cheer”video, but in looking for it, I came across something even more disturbing, which is below the fold because it’s possibly NSFW.
(depending on your interest in toe-sucking and pre-pubescent-looking females)
.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Newspapers: Someone Else Is Successful At Something So We Need to Do That

Just because Buzzfeed is good at what Buzzfeed is doing, does not mean that you need to be Buzzfeed:

Internal documents obtained by WW show that a quota system is being put in place that calls for steep increases in posting to Oregonlive.com, and promises compensation for those employees who post most often.

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com.

Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year.

In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers.

“On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.”

This is what happens when you have management by panic, and that’s how newspapers have been run for at least the last 40 years. Forget the Internet: The minute TV news came around, newspapers had to be more immediate, more visual, because that’s what TV was good at. Then the 24-hour networks, so let’s all cover whatever they’re covering, in the same half-assed way they’re covering it, because people like that now.

And now this jumping at every goddamn online trend that whistles past the door. I don’t actually think this is an impossible goal or anything, and good reporters usually can throw out enough cheap stuff to keep editors happy while still working on longer term stories, but the rationale is what burns my ass:

The new policy will likely increase Oregonlive.com‘s use of daily, short posts that follow an original news post by reporting on readers’ comments, creating polls to gauge reader reaction, and “aggregating” the site’s most popular stories—as a way to build page views.

The policy says Advance is aiming to increase Oregonlive.com page views by 27.7 percent by the end of the year. (The paper’s traffic is already sizable, with online metrics site Quantcast showing 23 million page views last month.)

“Advance, for better or for worse, has been the most aggressive American newspaper company in moving to the web,” says Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. “This is their bet. It makes sense that they would want to align their staff with that bet.”

First of all, can you think of anything less compelling than reporting that is based on reader comments? (If they were my reader comments, this would make sense, but in the case of a newspaper web site it’s more likely to lead to headlines like, AREA RESIDENTS SAY THEY HATE OUR BEET RECIPE, BLAME NEGRO PRESIDENT.)

Second, if the paper already has good web traffic, why screw with it? I mean is there any other business that says to its customers, “So this thing you like, we’re gonna make it like this other thing instead, because people like that thing, too?” In what universe does that make any kind of sense?

You don’t have to be everything to everybody. You don’t have to sell floor wax and pizza. You do have to figure out whether you’re better at producing pepperoni or shining the linoleum, pick one, and go with it. That can be hard to do, but flailing from one Internet trend to another is just going to make it harder.

A.

Newspapers: Someone Else Is Successful At Something So We Need to Do That

Just because Buzzfeed is good at what Buzzfeed is doing, does not mean that you need to be Buzzfeed:

Internal documents obtained by WW show that a quota system is being put in place that calls for steep increases in posting to Oregonlive.com, and promises compensation for those employees who post most often.

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com.

Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year.

In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers.

“On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.”

This is what happens when you have management by panic, and that’s how newspapers have been run for at least the last 40 years. Forget the Internet: The minute TV news came around, newspapers had to be more immediate, more visual, because that’s what TV was good at. Then the 24-hour networks, so let’s all cover whatever they’re covering, in the same half-assed way they’re covering it, because people like that now.

And now this jumping at every goddamn online trend that whistles past the door. I don’t actually think this is an impossible goal or anything, and good reporters usually can throw out enough cheap stuff to keep editors happy while still working on longer term stories, but the rationale is what burns my ass:

The new policy will likely increase Oregonlive.com‘s use of daily, short posts that follow an original news post by reporting on readers’ comments, creating polls to gauge reader reaction, and “aggregating” the site’s most popular stories—as a way to build page views.

The policy says Advance is aiming to increase Oregonlive.com page views by 27.7 percent by the end of the year. (The paper’s traffic is already sizable, with online metrics site Quantcast showing 23 million page views last month.)

“Advance, for better or for worse, has been the most aggressive American newspaper company in moving to the web,” says Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. “This is their bet. It makes sense that they would want to align their staff with that bet.”

First of all, can you think of anything less compelling than reporting that is based on reader comments? (If they were my reader comments, this would make sense, but in the case of a newspaper web site it’s more likely to lead to headlines like, AREA RESIDENTS SAY THEY HATE OUR BEET RECIPE, BLAME NEGRO PRESIDENT.)

Second, if the paper already has good web traffic, why screw with it? I mean is there any other business that says to its customers, “So this thing you like, we’re gonna make it like this other thing instead, because people like that thing, too?” In what universe does that make any kind of sense?

You don’t have to be everything to everybody. You don’t have to sell floor wax and pizza. You do have to figure out whether you’re better at producing pepperoni or shining the linoleum, pick one, and go with it. That can be hard to do, but flailing from one Internet trend to another is just going to make it harder.

A.

Newspapers: Someone Else Is Successful At Something So We Need to Do That

Just because Buzzfeed is good at what Buzzfeed is doing, does not mean that you need to be Buzzfeed:

Internal documents obtained by WW show that a quota system is being put in place that calls for steep increases in posting to Oregonlive.com, and promises compensation for those employees who post most often.

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com.

Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year.

In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers.

“On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.”

This is what happens when you have management by panic, and that’s how newspapers have been run for at least the last 40 years. Forget the Internet: The minute TV news came around, newspapers had to be more immediate, more visual, because that’s what TV was good at. Then the 24-hour networks, so let’s all cover whatever they’re covering, in the same half-assed way they’re covering it, because people like that now.

And now this jumping at every goddamn online trend that whistles past the door. I don’t actually think this is an impossible goal or anything, and good reporters usually can throw out enough cheap stuff to keep editors happy while still working on longer term stories, but the rationale is what burns my ass:

The new policy will likely increase Oregonlive.com‘s use of daily, short posts that follow an original news post by reporting on readers’ comments, creating polls to gauge reader reaction, and “aggregating” the site’s most popular stories—as a way to build page views.

The policy says Advance is aiming to increase Oregonlive.com page views by 27.7 percent by the end of the year. (The paper’s traffic is already sizable, with online metrics site Quantcast showing 23 million page views last month.)

“Advance, for better or for worse, has been the most aggressive American newspaper company in moving to the web,” says Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. “This is their bet. It makes sense that they would want to align their staff with that bet.”

First of all, can you think of anything less compelling than reporting that is based on reader comments? (If they were my reader comments, this would make sense, but in the case of a newspaper web site it’s more likely to lead to headlines like, AREA RESIDENTS SAY THEY HATE OUR BEET RECIPE, BLAME NEGRO PRESIDENT.)

Second, if the paper already has good web traffic, why screw with it? I mean is there any other business that says to its customers, “So this thing you like, we’re gonna make it like this other thing instead, because people like that thing, too?” In what universe does that make any kind of sense?

You don’t have to be everything to everybody. You don’t have to sell floor wax and pizza. You do have to figure out whether you’re better at producing pepperoni or shining the linoleum, pick one, and go with it. That can be hard to do, but flailing from one Internet trend to another is just going to make it harder.

A.

Newspapers: Someone Else Is Successful At Something So We Need to Do That

Just because Buzzfeed is good at what Buzzfeed is doing, does not mean that you need to be Buzzfeed:

Internal documents obtained by WW show that a quota system is being put in place that calls for steep increases in posting to Oregonlive.com, and promises compensation for those employees who post most often.

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com.

Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year.

In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers.

“On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.”

This is what happens when you have management by panic, and that’s how newspapers have been run for at least the last 40 years. Forget the Internet: The minute TV news came around, newspapers had to be more immediate, more visual, because that’s what TV was good at. Then the 24-hour networks, so let’s all cover whatever they’re covering, in the same half-assed way they’re covering it, because people like that now.

And now this jumping at every goddamn online trend that whistles past the door. I don’t actually think this is an impossible goal or anything, and good reporters usually can throw out enough cheap stuff to keep editors happy while still working on longer term stories, but the rationale is what burns my ass:

The new policy will likely increase Oregonlive.com‘s use of daily, short posts that follow an original news post by reporting on readers’ comments, creating polls to gauge reader reaction, and “aggregating” the site’s most popular stories—as a way to build page views.

The policy says Advance is aiming to increase Oregonlive.com page views by 27.7 percent by the end of the year. (The paper’s traffic is already sizable, with online metrics site Quantcast showing 23 million page views last month.)

“Advance, for better or for worse, has been the most aggressive American newspaper company in moving to the web,” says Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. “This is their bet. It makes sense that they would want to align their staff with that bet.”

First of all, can you think of anything less compelling than reporting that is based on reader comments? (If they were my reader comments, this would make sense, but in the case of a newspaper web site it’s more likely to lead to headlines like, AREA RESIDENTS SAY THEY HATE OUR BEET RECIPE, BLAME NEGRO PRESIDENT.)

Second, if the paper already has good web traffic, why screw with it? I mean is there any other business that says to its customers, “So this thing you like, we’re gonna make it like this other thing instead, because people like that thing, too?” In what universe does that make any kind of sense?

You don’t have to be everything to everybody. You don’t have to sell floor wax and pizza. You do have to figure out whether you’re better at producing pepperoni or shining the linoleum, pick one, and go with it. That can be hard to do, but flailing from one Internet trend to another is just going to make it harder.

A.

Newspapers: Someone Else Is Successful At Something So We Need to Do That

Just because Buzzfeed is good at what Buzzfeed is doing, does not mean that you need to be Buzzfeed:

Internal documents obtained by WW show that a quota system is being put in place that calls for steep increases in posting to Oregonlive.com, and promises compensation for those employees who post most often.

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com.

Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year.

In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers.

“On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.”

This is what happens when you have management by panic, and that’s how newspapers have been run for at least the last 40 years. Forget the Internet: The minute TV news came around, newspapers had to be more immediate, more visual, because that’s what TV was good at. Then the 24-hour networks, so let’s all cover whatever they’re covering, in the same half-assed way they’re covering it, because people like that now.

And now this jumping at every goddamn online trend that whistles past the door. I don’t actually think this is an impossible goal or anything, and good reporters usually can throw out enough cheap stuff to keep editors happy while still working on longer term stories, but the rationale is what burns my ass:

The new policy will likely increase Oregonlive.com‘s use of daily, short posts that follow an original news post by reporting on readers’ comments, creating polls to gauge reader reaction, and “aggregating” the site’s most popular stories—as a way to build page views.

The policy says Advance is aiming to increase Oregonlive.com page views by 27.7 percent by the end of the year. (The paper’s traffic is already sizable, with online metrics site Quantcast showing 23 million page views last month.)

“Advance, for better or for worse, has been the most aggressive American newspaper company in moving to the web,” says Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. “This is their bet. It makes sense that they would want to align their staff with that bet.”

First of all, can you think of anything less compelling than reporting that is based on reader comments? (If they were my reader comments, this would make sense, but in the case of a newspaper web site it’s more likely to lead to headlines like, AREA RESIDENTS SAY THEY HATE OUR BEET RECIPE, BLAME NEGRO PRESIDENT.)

Second, if the paper already has good web traffic, why screw with it? I mean is there any other business that says to its customers, “So this thing you like, we’re gonna make it like this other thing instead, because people like that thing, too?” In what universe does that make any kind of sense?

You don’t have to be everything to everybody. You don’t have to sell floor wax and pizza. You do have to figure out whether you’re better at producing pepperoni or shining the linoleum, pick one, and go with it. That can be hard to do, but flailing from one Internet trend to another is just going to make it harder.

A.

Newspapers: Someone Else Is Successful At Something So We Need to Do That

Just because Buzzfeed is good at what Buzzfeed is doing, does not mean that you need to be Buzzfeed:

Internal documents obtained by WW show that a quota system is being put in place that calls for steep increases in posting to Oregonlive.com, and promises compensation for those employees who post most often.

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com.

Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year.

In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers.

“On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.”

This is what happens when you have management by panic, and that’s how newspapers have been run for at least the last 40 years. Forget the Internet: The minute TV news came around, newspapers had to be more immediate, more visual, because that’s what TV was good at. Then the 24-hour networks, so let’s all cover whatever they’re covering, in the same half-assed way they’re covering it, because people like that now.

And now this jumping at every goddamn online trend that whistles past the door. I don’t actually think this is an impossible goal or anything, and good reporters usually can throw out enough cheap stuff to keep editors happy while still working on longer term stories, but the rationale is what burns my ass:

The new policy will likely increase Oregonlive.com‘s use of daily, short posts that follow an original news post by reporting on readers’ comments, creating polls to gauge reader reaction, and “aggregating” the site’s most popular stories—as a way to build page views.

The policy says Advance is aiming to increase Oregonlive.com page views by 27.7 percent by the end of the year. (The paper’s traffic is already sizable, with online metrics site Quantcast showing 23 million page views last month.)

“Advance, for better or for worse, has been the most aggressive American newspaper company in moving to the web,” says Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. “This is their bet. It makes sense that they would want to align their staff with that bet.”

First of all, can you think of anything less compelling than reporting that is based on reader comments? (If they were my reader comments, this would make sense, but in the case of a newspaper web site it’s more likely to lead to headlines like, AREA RESIDENTS SAY THEY HATE OUR BEET RECIPE, BLAME NEGRO PRESIDENT.)

Second, if the paper already has good web traffic, why screw with it? I mean is there any other business that says to its customers, “So this thing you like, we’re gonna make it like this other thing instead, because people like that thing, too?” In what universe does that make any kind of sense?

You don’t have to be everything to everybody. You don’t have to sell floor wax and pizza. You do have to figure out whether you’re better at producing pepperoni or shining the linoleum, pick one, and go with it. That can be hard to do, but flailing from one Internet trend to another is just going to make it harder.

A.

Rumsfeld Isn’t Sorry

Not that it would matter if he was:

Rumsfeld and McNamara seem to be very different kinds of people.

They couldn’t be more different. But they presided over disastrous wars. That’s not OK. You can be reflective, you can be remorseful, you can be really engaged by the tales of what you have done and haven’t done. And McNamara realized this. There’s no magic slate for any of us; we can’t just pull up the acetate and it all goes away.

McNamara at least had some regrets that he was willing to share.

Rumsfeld is also willing to share the fact that he has no regrets, isn’t sorry, sees nothing wrong with what he’s done. In fact, he’s proud of it.

Well, and I’m not sure it matters either way. If he’s sorry, then fuck him. If he’s not sorry, fuck him. The dead are dead. The wounded are wounded. There aren’t degrees here, where if you’re sorry you go to a slightly higher level of hell. Nobody cares about their immortal souls but them. To the rest of us, all that matters are the results.

A.