This Will Fix It

Surely this will solve everybody’s problems:

Texas A&M University’s student Senate recently approved a bill that would no longer allow illegal immigrants attending the school to be eligible for in-state tuition rates.

Since 2001, illegal immigrants in Texas have qualified for in-state tuition, which offers them a generous discount compared to out-of-state students attending the university. Texas A&M has 49,000 students, and about 300 are illegal immigrants.

[snip]

Demonstrators took to campus streets and held up signs that said, “Aggies don’t fight Aggies,” and “We don’t choose to be illegal.” Many of the demonstrators support proposed federal legislation called the Dream Act — which would allow immigrant children to remain in the United States to serve in the military or attend college.

Justin Pulliam, student Senator and chairman of Texas Aggie Conservatives, the co-author of the S.B. 63-11 bill, predicts that Dream Act Activists will turn out Wednesday when the bill is brought back onto the floor. Students will have an option to override Robinson’s veto.

“Dream Act Activists are very effective and good at being heard,” Pulliam said. But he says there are others not so vocal — students and faculty alike — who support the bill.

First of all, “the lurkers support me in e-mail?” I know all college conservatives are basically the same douchey frathead cloned in Dick Cheney’s bunker and programmed to say stuff like “It’s an infringement on my free speech if I can’t call you names without you telling me to fuck off” but COME ON, really?

Second, well, now that you’ve screwed over 300 kids trying to make a decent life for themselves out of circumstances they had no part in creating, life for the other 48,700 should just kick ass. I’m sure everything will be fine for you, now you’ve got the important shit handled. The 65 cents you save can be put to good use buying an extra can of soda for the cafeteria. Way to go!

A.

10 thoughts on “This Will Fix It

  1. MichaelF says:

    Immoral values, indeed. I guess the cliche about how character is revealed in times of crisis has some truth in it: the clowns trying to screw over a whopping 300 out of 49,000 students are sadistic ghouls.
    And not too smart either: Educated people, documented or not, are of greater value in a particular community. To be blunt, the additional economic value they bring to an area attracts more business, more educated people, and so on.
    The alternative is stagnation. But I dunno, maybe Aggies want it that way…and maybe that’s why they call them Aggies.

  2. mothra says:

    Well, it is Texas.

  3. jo6pac says:

    I’ll take them in Calif. and the Calif. Supremes just made this legal for illegals to go to school as a native Calif. Very Cool.

  4. pansypoo says:

    short sided. but it shirley is the ‘christian thing to do’.

  5. Gizmodeus says:

    ok I gotta say something here. Someone explain to me how it is fair or logical that people who are actually born in this country and want higher education are required to pay MORE for it than someone who is in the country illegally. The actual numbers are meaningless. 3, 30, 300, or 3000, doesn’t matter. The fact is, people who are breaking the law are getting a huge break on their higher education, when people here are, in a lot of cases, scraping just enough together to afford an education for their own kids.
    “Educated people, documented or not, are of greater value in a particular community. To be blunt, the additional economic value they bring to an area attracts more business, more educated people, and so on.” I would love to see those stats. Educated People tend to run from depressed economic zones, for areas of “better schools” (i.e. private) and “better environments” (read lower crime). Businesses follow where the educated and their money go, not the other way around.
    “Second, well, now that you’ve screwed over 300 kids trying to make a decent life for themselves out of circumstances they had no part in creating,” These, I assume, are not the children of illegals, but collage age illegals who want an education in Texas. If that is the case then they ARE responsible for their own circumstances. This whole mind set of non-responsibility is a dodge.
    Your arguments are weak, based on what I have read. Normally I don’t agree with conservatives, but on this one, I do.

  6. virgotex says:

    First: student senates don’t set tuition rates. Not that they don’t have the ear of the the idiots in the Lege. Like all good junior fascists, Pullam knows politics and knows the upcoming Lege is ginning up for a budget shortfall bloodbath.
    Second: Mothra, go sit by Gizmodeus on the Lame Shit Kneejerk Schmucks Say bench

  7. MichaelF says:

    Gizmodeus — The Google can be your friend:
    http://adulted.about.com/od/goingbacktoschool/qt/highersalary.htm
    Studies show time and time again that your salary goes up when you earn a degree. Some adults return to school for the sheer joy of learning, but most of us find ourselves back in the classroom for a degree, or another one, that will earn us more income.
    Studies by the U.S. Department of Education prove that your effort pays off.
    In 2007, the Census Bureau reported the following statistics:
    Earnings Estimates:
    $19,405 Less than a high school diploma
    $26,894 High school diploma
    $32,874 Some college or associate’s degree
    $46,805 Bachelor’s degree
    $62,287 Graduate or professional degree
    The DOE has a similar table. It also generalizes, reporting that the “pattern of higher earnings corresponding with higher levels of educational attainment was consistent for each year shown between 1995 and 2007.” The pattern holds for male, female, white, black, Hispanic, and Asian subgroups, they say.

    Maybe some of these higher earners will flee for suburban Dallas, or Houston, or Anytown, USA, and perhaps they’ll insist on nothing but private schools, Wonder Bread, and “responsible” SUVs and/or McMansions…or maybe they’ll stay in College Station…or maybe they’ll relocate within or even outside the good old USA. We don’t know…but what we DO know is that 46 or 62K not only provides a higher quality of life for the individual and/or their family, but it also provides far more income potentially or actually distributed throughout a community/Census designated location than, say, 19 to 26K.
    Re: “not the children of illegals, but collage [sic] age illegals who want an education in Texas.” Are you sure about that? Take a look at the article. It spells out additional criteria, including the fact that individuals applying to college must have graduated from “a local high school.” Now, I suppose you could insist that all 300 were of majority age upon enrollment in said local high schools…but I’m just as entitled to say I don’t believe that for a second.
    My own inclination assumes Occam’s Razor has some weight here–I’d bet most if not all 300 individuals in question enrolled in “local high school(s)” as minors under the custody of their (illegal) parents. I think you can also logically infer that enrollment in a local high school implies some familiarity with the community itself, and some familiarity with local customs, which might well include instruction mostly if not solely in English…even in Texas. Go figure.
    And while their parents might well be illegal, that doesn’t mean they’ve avoided paying taxes…taxes which support universities, among other things. These remittances are a major consideration in setting lower tuition rates for State residents.
    What I find truly amazing, though, is the utter zeal to punish these kids, particularly given that, in the whole scheme of things, we’re really talking small change, and we’re doing it at our own long term expense, i.e., society BENEFITS from an educated population, not an ignorant one.
    Which is why I find it even more frustrating that we’re even discussing sticking it to a small number of kids, while we can’t shovel money fast enough to incompetent bankers, well-connected defense contractors, K Street lobbyists, and so on…

  8. virgotex says:

    But what we DO know is that 46 or 62K not only provides a higher quality of life for the individual and/or their family, but it also provides far more income potentially or actually distributed throughout a community/Census designated location than, say, 19 to 26K.
    This is also a major component in the analysis as more public universities in TX are qualifying as HSIs -Hispanic Serving Institutions. Of course, the same people will still get up in arms because it’s not just about legal vs illegal, it’s about getting educated while brown.

  9. pansypoo says:

    4 years of college should be like high school then.

  10. BlackSheep1 says:

    VirgoTex: thanks for that.
    It’s not so much that this is Texas as that this is A&M — Governor Rick Perry’s alma mater.
    Formerly the place SecDef Robert Gates served as its president.
    These are the people the TEA potty wishes its children could be.
    And they want to return to the “Bonfire” tradition, destroying thousands of trees and risking life and limb for the sake of a single pep rally.
    I wish TAMU really was consistently sucky, but sadly, it’s not. Many of its white male students are, though.

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