Still More Bolton

From Holden:

First, we have this, slipped in to the very end of a CNN article about the State Department refusing document requests from Democrats.

On Monday, 43 former U.S. ambassadors added their names to a letter signed earlier by 59 ex-ambassadors opposing the nomination. Most served in Republican administrations.

And here’s more evidence of how Bolton and Boltonism is contributing to the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

Washington isn’t taking “the common bargain” of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty as seriously as it once did, and that’s dimming global support for the U.S. campaign to shut down the North Korean and Iranian nuclear programs, the former chief U.N. weapons inspector said.

Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton, by questioning the value of treaties and international law, has also damaged the U.S. position, Hans Blix said.

“There is a feeling the common edifice of the international community is being dismantled,” the Swedish arms expert said.

[snip]

Blix told reporters there is “a great deal of concern” about North Korea and Iran among states without nuclear weapons.

But “that feeling of concern is somewhat muted by the feeling that the United States in particular, and perhaps some other nuclear weapons states, are not taking the common bargain as seriously as they had committed themselves to do in the past,” he said.

He cited Bush administration proposals to build new nuclear weapons and talk in Washington even of testing weapons, ending a 13-year-old U.S. moratorium on nuclear tests. He also referred to statements by Bolton, President Bush’s embattled nominee to be U.N. ambassador, devaluing treaties and the authority of international law.

“Why are you complaining about (North Korea) breaching the treaty if treaties are not binding?” Blix, an international lawyer, asked rhetorically.