Weekend Question Post

Who is your hero/heroine?

A.

17 thoughts on “Weekend Question Post

  1. The people of New Orleans that are fighting the system and fighting back for THEIR lives, THEIR homes, THEIR community and THEIR city. They are my heroes/heroines!!!
    🙂
    (and I happily and enthusiastically include all the folks that are outside the geographical boundaries of New Orleans that are keeping awareness out there, blogging and doing what they can for the Y’ats!)
    Should my life path include my living there someday, I would love to call them friends and neighbors.
    Namaste,
    Elspeth

  2. Escariot says:

    Dr Paul Farmer
    hands down.

  3. Monkeyfister says:

    All of my heroes are dead, sadly, but Jacques Cousteau was my hero forever.
    There isn’t a person alive these days worthy of any sort of hero title AFAIK.
    –mf

  4. pansypoo says:

    in drawing class we had to draw, the teach had us draw our hero or relate to our hero and i couldn’t think of one, just an antihero cause i had just read a book on freud who came up with a BS theory when the establishment didn’t believe that the child sex abuse cases he had uncovered. because INCEST never happens. MOLESTATION never happens. so instead we get penis envy. so i did anti-freud drawings. what can i say. i don’t hero worship.

  5. liprap says:

    Janet Sunday, the smarts behind George Sunday in the Britcom: “My Hero”. Heh.
    I can’t say that I really had many heroes to look up to until I read some books about social justice – namely “Coming of Age in Mississippi” by Anne Moody, and the stories of those who helped Jews and members of other persecuted groups evade capture and survive the Shoah. It takes a lot of guts to go against the prevailing law of the land when one knows it is morally wrong…and that, if one publicly expresses his/her beliefs, one will most likely perish in some way for that public expression.
    The tricky part is trying to figure out if the moral compass really is correct – those who broadcast their morality a little too prominently may also be suspect. For example, those who practice my religion in an orthodox manner and go a little or a lot overboard in using the halakhah, or Jewish law, as an absolute in determining who is or is not a Jew. If the state of Israel went by this criteria, I and many of my fellow Jews would not be considered Jewish. The Russian Jewish “refusenik” population that was denied immigration visas for so long and, at the same time, forbidden to practice their religion in Soviet Russia would not have been able to immigrate to Israel by that criteria.
    It’s tricky, this hero/heroine business. Best thing is that study of Torah Rabbi Akiva gave to a man while the man was standing on one leg: “What is hateful to you, do not do unto your neighbor. All the rest is commentary. Go and study.”

  6. joejoejoe says:

    Alex Scott & her parents
    http://www.alexslemonade.org/lemonade_stand.php

  7. Gaseous Gray says:

    Guitar hero – Phil Keaggy
    Political hero – Dennis Kucinich
    Hair hero – James Traficant
    Religious hero – none
    Military hero – none (certainly not Cranky McCain… doesn’t fit my definition of “hero”)
    Mafia hero – Aniello Dellacroce
    Singing hero – Ol’ Blue Eyes
    Singing French hero – Serge Gainsbourg
    Movie hero – tie – M. Scorsese, A. Hitchcock
    Lawyer hero – Vincent Bugliosi
    Personal hero – Mrs. Gaseous Gray (I value my health & happiness)

  8. Doc says:

    The worst view I’ve ever seen of heroes is this one: “If you need a hero, you have diminished yourself in some way.”
    The best? “A hero is one who knows how to hang on one minute longer.”
    — Novalis
    To that end, my hero is Lew Burdette. The man beat the Yankees three times in the 1957 World Series, picking up a sagging pitching staff that was rocked when Warren Spahn fell ill. He out-pitched Hall-of-Famer Whitey Ford 1-0 in Game Five, which included an amazing catch by Wes Covington. Two years later, he bested Harvey Haddix who was throwing “the Imperfect Masterpiece.” Haddix pitched 12 innings of perfect baseball, 36 up, 36 down and still lost to Burdette. “The hardest rock thrower in Nitro, WV” scattered 12 Pirate hits and managed to win the game 1-0 in the 13th. How is it possible to face down perfection and know you are imperfect? How do press on when faced with the knowledge that even the most minute failure will cost you the prize? I can’t imagine, but I admire the hell out of Burdette for it.
    Alas, as MF noted about y’all heroes, Burdette died in February 2007.
    -Doc

  9. Terrance says:

    Captain Beefheart

  10. slim says:

    So many, but at the top is my friend A., who is taking care of two young sons on her own, while working toward her PhD in Women’s Studies and working as a massage therapist (her husband’s worsening schizophrenia made her marriage untenable).
    I have to second Paul Farmer.
    Also, Hanan Ashrawi.
    And, my husband J., who works his beautiful, cyclist’s ass off as a 6th grade teacher – I have never seen anyone work harder in my life – and is spending his time off this summer building us a bigger bathroom. Is it any wonder I love him?

  11. mdh says:

    In my imagination – Carl Sagan.
    In my mind – Madeline Albright
    In my reality – Helen Thomas

  12. GentillyGirl says:

    I have three heroines: Kate Bornstein “Gender Outlaw” who made me take the right path and be Whole, my mother who’s quiet simple ways informed my life and thoughts, and my Betty who has fought the battle to get us back in our home and hasn’t strangled me yet.
    As for heroes, Thomas Jefferson and… wait for it… Batman.

  13. John Onorato says:

    Hey, I was just kidding about the Bush because he’s like Batman thing, which seems to have disappeared from the comments here. I guess I thought it was so transparently ridiculous I didn’t need to add any kind of snark tag.
    I don’t know anyone without flaws, and I offer these with the qualification they all had ’em. “Heros” is a tough word for me to use, because it is a tough thing for me to feel.
    Jefferson and Franklin for Founding Fathers.
    Jimmy Page on guitar.
    Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Mother Teresa, but only after her writings questioning her own faith were made public. Selflessness and incredible sacrifice in the face of serious spiritual doubt.
    Mickey Mantle, that rare athlete who told kids not to be like him by drinking themselves to death at an early age.
    Muhammed Ali. Strength (all kinds) and humor and beauty.
    Every teacher, parent, and public servant who does their work with compassion, skill, love and integrity. And every woman who has ever cracked a ceiling maintaining the same characteristics.
    The progressive blogosphere, for trying to shine a light of reason and truth through the spectacular fog and glare of a government and media dying and killing as we watch.

  14. mdh says:

    I should add a founding father to my list: John Adams

  15. Heroes?
    Texas Tech University Lady Raiders’ Coach Marsha Sharp.
    Yeah, just the one, really. Lady with integrity, intestinal fortitude, and a fine eye for a shooter.

  16. dancinfool says:

    My mother.

  17. karen marie says:

    my hero is don quixote de la mancha. because he is everywhere, little bits of him pop up like shining rays of hope in the midst of the threatening dark, in the form of people like paul farmer, mlk jr., nye bevan, rosa parks and bill moyers.
    unlikely heroes are writers like donald e. westlake, who has brought more joy and ease to my life than a score of others, and p.g. wodehouse, without whom i likely would be laying by the roadside with an exploded head. writers who magically distill the essence of life onto the blank, dry, flat surface of paper are all heroes.

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