CHILL

I have hidden your keys:

If mere numbers of journalists are considered an indicator of quality,
the growth of journalist employment from 1970s to 2000 should have made
journalism extraordinary in the 1980s and 1990s. No one should have
been surprised by the savings and loan debacle, the Soviet Bloc
collapsing, the international debt crisis in developing nations , U.S.
aid to governments in central America and the Iran-contra affair, child
labor in the developing world, the explosive growth of Chinese economy,
or rising domestic and international terrorism. But we were surprised
and journalists didn’t forewarn us. Obviously, the attention of the
rising number of journalists was turned elsewhere.

If you look
at newsrooms you can see the problem. Most journalists in newspapers do
everything BUT covering significant news. They spend their time doing
celebrity, food, automobile, and entertainment stories. Look around any
newsroom, or just the lists of assignments or beats, and you soon come
to realize that 20 percent or fewer of the journalists in newsrooms
actually produce the kind of news that most people are concerned about
losing.

It is not the mere number of journalists that matters;
it’s the choices that editors and publishers make about how to use the
journalists available to them. Journalists are a crucial resource and
how they are utilized has a significant influence on quality. Few
newspapers have cut sections or types of coverage, choosing instead to
cut throughout the newsroom and not to reassign journalists to the
kinds of journalism that matters most to society.

Viawhet.

I fucking love Twitter, by the way. I know lots of people think it’s sucking the joy out of life or something, and trivializing America the way the whole Internet does, but for me, the link-exchange idea factory it’s becoming is like a crack IV jacked directly into my brain.

A.

9 thoughts on “CHILL

  1. Totally off topic and unrelated to anything of value, but I wanted to ask A if she had any other suggestions for television other than BSG. (Finished Season 3 with Season 4 queued up and to be mailed shortly). Thanks in advance.

  2. Article in the Boston Glub yesterday on the difficulty of reducing your carbon footprint. 4 paragraphs on proper choice of bottled water brand. 2 sentences on beef vs poultry.
    Estimate from http://www.treehugger.com/files/2007/02/pablo_calculate.php , 8,000 full bottles shipped across the Pacific to make a ton of GHG CO2-equivalent, similar to what you get from downsizing your car, or switching from beef to poultry.

  3. Most of the folk bashing Twitter aren’t on it. As noted before, it’s not that different in spirit than the threads over at the Crack Den.
    HIVE

  4. bdub, I’m liking the look of Kings, the new Ian McShane thing (mrowr). Breaking Bad on AMC is good. Trust Me on TNT isn’t as good as it should be, but it’s getting there.
    And I LOVE Life, on NBC, but they FUCKING cancelled it. Assholes. The first season of that was as close to perfect storytelling as you get on TV.
    Kings could be the new Galactica, if the writing gets less uneven and the David Shepherd character learns how to act.
    A.

  5. I’d like to put in a word for Saving Grace. Holly Hunter, cop with drinking and sex issues, Oklahoma city still dealing with the fall out of the McVeigh bombing.
    She gets a “last chance angel” and we all get to talk about what it all means. The angel is not what you expect.
    They have dealt with lots of issues about God, death, sex, drugs, murder, execution, family and friendship.

  6. Thanks everybody. I cancelled the movie channels and am trying to find something to watch other than Olbermann and Maddow.

  7. I have to admit I got sucked into Damages. Good noirish soap opera.
    For good TV, never fear reaching back into the vault: been watching a lot of Kids in the Hall and Father Ted. Starting to explore The League of Gentlemen.
    BTW, if you want some awesome (if dated) TV writing, I do recommendLee Sandlin.

  8. It is not the mere number of journalists that matters; it’s the choices that editors and publishers make about how to use the journalists available to them. Journalists are a crucial resource and how they are utilized has a significant influence on quality. Few newspapers have cut sections or types of coverage, choosing instead to cut throughout the newsroom and not to reassign journalists to the kinds of journalism that matters most to society.
    This misses the point.
    Newspapers do not want good news writing because car dealers don’t give a fuck about good news writing. And car dealers are who buys most the ads. Ergo, the publisher is mostly concerned about what the car dealers think.

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