Sunday Starbuck Video

Because fuck yeah, Katee Sackhoff:

“Never gonna happen in the US. Proper gun safety is a necessity though. RT @FulsomPrison: @kateesackhoff @CNN @cnni Here’s a radical idea folks. How about NO gun?”

That was pretty much the closest the actress, known for her role on “Battlestar Galactica” as well as for playing Vic Moretti on the A&E Western/cop series, “Longmire,” came to a specific stance on the matter. Despite this, a whole bunch of Twitter users didn’t seem to want to hear it.

“On a lighter note since I’ve lost half my followers due to talking about gun safety…the sun is shining & Happy Monday! Love your neighbor today!”

Sackhoff signed out of the debate altogether with a final push for safety, no matter what your viewpoint.

“Well I guess I just learned talking about #GunSafety inspires a massive debate. Pro-Gun or Anti-Gun SAFETY should be unanimous! #OneLove”

What I love about celebrities on Twitter is mostly the reaction of people for whom the old model of celebrity, ie I project all my assumptions and personality traits onto a mysterious person I never have to know, utterly breaks down. For all the occasional stupidity that arises, it’s FASCINATING watching people resist the “shut up and sing” pressure and participate in the conversation that they do indeed have access to as members of society. If Julia Roberts pays her taxes, she’s just as entitled to share her views on anything going on.

I’ll always be in favor of greater and greater connection, exchange of more and more information between everybody, even if it does lead to the occsional crushing disappointment (damn it, Jeremy Irons) or moment of dismay. The more we allow others to be complex and real to us, the more we get comfortable with the idea of being so ourselves.

A.

2 thoughts on “Sunday Starbuck Video

  1. virgotex says:

    Neko Case recently tweeted a picture of a tick and asked followers how much they’d give her to eat it. Not complex,but not disappointing.
    ” I project all my assumptions and personality traits onto a mysterious person I never have to know”
    “The more we allow others to be complex and real to us, the more we get comfortable with the idea of being so ourselves.
    in the recent CBC video interview with Joni Mitchell, she talks very eloquently– not in a poor poor me I’m a beleagured celebrity way–about having had to come to grips (decades ago) with the weight of all that projection of those people that only see the celebrity, and all the stuff they’ve projected/plastered onto them – how that is straight-up mental illness, an absence of something, and the tragedy of it, and how epidemic it was/is was overwhelming to her when her music really took off. It’s not the same as those who admire an artist and find out more about themselves and their own world in that artist’s works (or even, these days, tweets/online identity). So, yeah, online conversation is a lot of things, good, bad, trivial, boring even. But people who participate in it are to some extent *connecting* having a conversation. Not just consuming, not just gazing.

  2. Lex says:

    “Trust the song, not the singer.” — Bruce Springsteen, pre-Twitter.
    Now there’s a way to at least try to figure out if you can do both.

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