Today on Tommy T’s Obsession with the Freeperati – Lazy Bastard edition

Not lazy so much as indisposed. I won't bore us with the details, but it's been a bad week for mobility.

So – a quickie.

Freepers aver: "Pulling out a gun over a tax is WRONG!"

Maniac or Patriot? Chicago Man Arrested for Brandishing Gun over Soda Tax
Tea Party Tribune ^ | April 15, 2014 | Paul Winters

Posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎27‎:‎50‎ ‎PM by dignitasnews

Chicago resident Nahshon Shelton was arrested over the weekend for allegedly pulling out a 22-caliber pistol gun and threatening a convenience store clerk and fellow customers in his anger over a 22-cent “sin” tax on the 2-liter Pepsi he was purchasing Saturday afternoon.

Chicago police reported that Shelton was adamant that his outburst was justified, as they quoted him as saying “This is my neighborhood, I’m tax exempt! Man, you know what, I’ll keep it real. I had to put them in their place.”

While I do not condone Shelton’s action, I cannot help but empathize with his frustrations. The tax, effectively 12% of the purchase price of the soda, is both egregious and an attempt to control our behaviors. Social engineering schemes of this nature are becoming all too common and run counter to the cultural roots of our nations principles.

While even those of us who consider ourselves to be conservative begrudgingly acknowledge some level of taxation is necessary to fund and maintain a working government, taxation with the intent to curb or control behavior is an insidious violation of all that we hold dear. It also reveals the enormous philosophical gulf between the left and the right , not simply in the proper levels of taxation, but its purpose.

The increasing attitude of the left is to utilize taxation as a punitive weapon. In the case of the soda-tax, and other levies on sugary snacks, liberals see these measures as a means to “protect us from ourselves.” Their hope is that by increasing the cost of these delectable delights, consumers will be more likely to opt for healthier, albeit more expensive, alternatives.

While one can certainly argue that a bottle of guava juice is a better choice for our bodies than a Pepsi, coercion via increased government taxation is the absolute definition of tyranny. While many liberals scoff at this notion, arguing that the tax amounts to less than a quarter, they miss the entire point. For the government, at any level, to monetarily penalize us for choosing a legal products that we desire is a denial of our freedoms. It is an attempt to control our behaviors by manipulating the free market and making our choices more costly.

In their zeal to legislate further penalties and costs on our choices, they also expose the hypocrisy of their so-called commitment to lower income Americans. These “sin-taxes,” be they on soda, cigarettes, Twinkies, gas or plastic grocery bags, have a disproportionate impact on poor and working class communities. When someone stops at the local Gas N Gulp to purchase 10 gallons of gas, grab a pack of smokes, a soda and a few other tasty treats, they will end up paying an extra $5 or so in taxes. And if one needs a bag to carry it all in, there’s another dime you’re going to have to fork over.

Mr. Shelton went about his revolt in the absolute wrong manner, and will most likely pay the price for this, deservedly so. But the emotions which drove him to this action are not altogether different than those which motivated a group of Boston resident to dump a boatload of tea in the harbor, not so long ago.

Give us liberty or give us death. Even if that death is from diabetes.

Personally, I think that deserves its own bumper sticker.

 1 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎27‎:‎50‎ ‎PM by dignitasnews
 
This appears to be another Shylock Moment for the Freeperati:
 
On the one hand, this appears to be a sterling example of a nutjob using a handgun for selfish and stupid purposes.
On the other hand, Boston Sucrose Party.
To: dignitasnews
 
“This is my neighborhood, I’m tax exempt!"

I need to move to his neighborhood.

2 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎29‎:‎15‎ ‎PM by ClearCase_guy
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To: dignitasnews

“Alex, I’m going to go with ‘Maniac, Not Patriot’ for $400.00.”

4 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎33‎:‎34‎ ‎PM by tumblindice (Are all Democrats inveterate, habitual liars?)
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To: dignitasnews

Threatening a store clerk with a gun just because he charged tax. What a maroon. Nahshon Shelton does not sound like the sharpest tack in the box.
The politicians Nahshon, the politicians. Not the clerks. sheesh.

11 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎50‎:‎25‎ ‎PM by Tupelo (I feel more like Philip Nolan every day)
 
And now, The Sucrose Party Patriots:
 
To: dignitasnews

The sin tax is a perfect example of the liberal mindset. They punish to control behavior. They can’t make the poor wealthier, so they punish the rich. They can’t make the healthy produce cheaper, so they raise the price on junk food. They can’t make the dumb kids smarter, so they lower the requirements and standards for all students. It goes on and on in everything they do.

9 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎45‎:‎36‎ ‎PM by Tenacious 1 (My whimsical litany of satyric prose and avarice pontification of wisdom demonstrates my concinnity.)
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To: dignitasnews

we had a revolution over a 3% tax on tea

on principal alone, there should never be any tax exceeding 3% on any food or beverage

and now that I think about it, I thought food was one of those things they weren’t ‘supposed’ to tax (yea, that ship sailed a long time ago)

19 posted on ‎4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎11‎:‎06‎:‎33‎ ‎PM by sten (fighting tyranny never goes out of style)
 
Mostly, though, the Freeperati seem to come down on the "nutcase" side of things:
To: dignitasnews; NFHale
 
RE :”While I do not condone Shelton’s action, I cannot help but empathize with his frustrations. The tax, effectively 12% of the purchase price of the soda, is both egregious and an attempt to control our behaviors. Social engineering schemes of this nature are becoming all too common and run counter to the cultural roots of our nations principles. “

Pulling guns on convenience store owners is a no-no and no I don't want a jury nullifying the law to save his rear.

Don't like the laws? Then take it up with the elected who pass them, and convince voters of your positions using arguments.

Definitely prosecute this guy.

26 posted on 4‎/‎16‎/‎2014‎ ‎9‎:‎04‎:‎26‎ ‎AM by sickoflibs (Obama : 'You can keep your doctor if you want. I never tell a lie ')
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To: sickoflibs; dignitasnews

ABSOLUTELY prosecute the guy. He threatened the life of an innocent person – with a gun or otherwise.

The gun has nothing to do with it, other than to be used as a political prop.

“Empathize”?? There’s nothing to empathize with. The guy acted like a thug, and should be treated like one.

We all hate high and unfair taxes, but that comes from ELECTING thugs in the first place. You don’t take that out on the local corner mom and pop store just trying to get by.

27 posted on ‎4‎/‎16‎/‎2014‎ ‎9‎:‎17‎:‎13‎ ‎AM by NFHale (The Second Amendment – By Any Means Necessary.)
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To: dignitasnews

By the way, there should be no marginalizing or condoning the actions the man took. Pulling out a gun over a tax is WRONG.

CaptainObvious

Had he been in any number of other big cities in red states, he may have been shot by other patrons.

10 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎46‎:‎52‎ ‎PM by Tenacious 1 (My whimsical litany of satyric prose and avarice pontification of wisdom demonstrates my concinnity.)
Wow.
Freepers coming out against a gun owner.
I wonder what could have provoked this turn-on-a-dime?
To: dignitasnews

 
6 posted on 4‎/‎15‎/‎2014‎ ‎10‎:‎37‎:‎46‎ ‎PM by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered – *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY – 86-44)
 
Oh.
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Never mind.
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See you good people next week.
 
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3 thoughts on “Today on Tommy T’s Obsession with the Freeperati – Lazy Bastard edition

  1. muddy says:

    Not just a gun owner, but a tax protester!

  2. maplestreet says:

    Not at all lazy. There was so much in the story that it overwhelms my ability to comment in a focused manner.
    You’ve covered the tax protester asserting his 2nd Amendment rights. (Wonder if he was part of Operation Spring or the Open Carry crowd?). I kind of suspect that at least a few freepers jumped on this being Chicago and spouted the usual drivel about Chicago’s gun-free attempts making it high crime (as if Chicago didn’t have crime before reducing the number of guns and the statistics don’t show that violent crime in Chicago is lower than many metro areas including St. Louis, Atlanta, etc.)
    Wonder how he would react to the skyrocketing cost of soda if the govt subsidies were removed (starting with crop subsidies for corn, further subsidies for High Fructose Corn Syrup, etc.) I was dumbfounded when I visited Montreal and saw the price of a 2 liter soda there.
    The claim that he is “tax free” seems bizarre.
    But above all, since when have taxes NOT been used to encourage or discourage certain behaviors ? Start with a list of deductions on a standard form 1040. Start with mortgage deduction which is openly touted as encouraging better communities by encouraging home ownership. Then IRAs and other retirement savings. Then make a list of all the deductions (please use 10 pt, Times font).

  3. maplestreet says:

    Oh, one enduring pattern throughout American history.
    Comment by “sten (fighting tyranny never goes out of style)” starting with “we had a revolution over a 3% tax on tea”
    The price of tea in the colonies had been subsidized; the price of tea in the colonies was thus artificially depressed and less than one would pay in England (can always argue the public policy of this and if the colonies in taking a financial and personal risk to advance the Empire deserved such a subsidy or not).
    Thus the “Tea Tax” was actually reducing the govt subsidy. (Although admittedly it happened on the tail of some other odd taxes such as the Stamp Act). The “Boston Tea Party” as well as the majority of anti-British sentiment was from the wealthy merchants in the NE who profited from the govt subsidies (sentiment in the South was for the British even with protests against many British measures, such as refusing the Stamp Act).
    In short, the Tea Party was a bunch of disgruntled, rich merchants protesting the govt decreasing a govt welfare that padded their pockets. Any current parallels ? /rhetorical question

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