Not Everything Sucks

It’s easy to imagine that in places where life is already hard, our current circumstances would make life harder. And they have, and they’ve made people braver, as well: 

Before long, word of the project had spread, and about two dozen people came together to help, working 13-hour days to turn the abandoned house into a welcoming checkpoint. “The house was full of 3-4 feet of snow,” said Bekoalok, who has limited mobility and volunteered from home as a coordinator. “They had to shovel the house out, and they put Visqueen on the windows, so that light comes in but the cold doesn’t.”

People donated hot plates, a generator, lights and a wood stove. They drilled a hole in the river for water, chopped firewood so that mushers would have a ready supply, and hung up a banner to welcome them. They put encouraging signs along the trail to tell teams they were almost there. “We had our youngest elders to babies hauling wood and water,” said Sookiayak, estimating that the youngest helpers were 4 years old.

A.

One thought on “Not Everything Sucks

  1. Mrs. Chippy says:

    Those are my peeps ❤ i worked in nome for several years 10 years ago and delivered a couple of babies from shaktoolik. It is a bit of history rhyming that the reason for closing the layover is a pandemic… The Iditarod celebrates the diphtheria serum run, an outbreak that nearly wiped out Nome.

    Like

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