I Get A Kick Out Of You

I hereby declare May to be Cole Porter month at the Friday Cocktail Hour. Why May? Why the hell not?

Cole Porter wrote I Get A Kick Out Of You in 1934 for the Broadway musical Anything Goes, which starred Ethel Merman. Porter loved Merman’s brassy-n-hammy voice. I do not. She used to scare the beejesus out of me when she appeared on variety shows in my youth. I bear the musical scars to this very day.

Since I love the featured image of Louis and Oscar so much, we begin with their version, which always gives me a boot as well as a kick:

Perhaps the best known interpretation of the Porter classic comes from the Sinatra-Riddle team. Dig that crazy lamppost.

I Get A Kick Out Of You isn’t my idea of Music For Torching but who am I to argue with Lady Day?

It’s time to dial the Psychic Hotline and request a song:

This 1995 version won a Grammy for arranger Rob McConnell. I think the Velvet Fog’s singing had something to do it with too.

Who among us doesn’t love Velvet & Brass as an album title? Yowsa.

Finally, Dolly Parton. Say no more.

What’s the Friday Cocktail Hours without a jazz instrumental version of the week’s tune? This time, Art Blakely & The Jazz Messengers followed by Benny Carter & Oscar Peterson.

Have I mentioned lately how much I love Oscar Peterson? I’m rather fond of Benny Carter as well.

That’s it for this week. Mix yourself a drink and toast something or other. It’s what Cole would want. Never argue with a man in wild and crazy pajamas.

3 thoughts on “I Get A Kick Out Of You

  1. waltauvil says:

    Before I listen to a single one of these let me say two things: (1) I adore Cole Porter. My favorite songwriter, bar none. (2) I love musical theater, but is doesn’t get better than musical theater with Cole Porter song

    • Peter Adrastos Athas says:

      I agree on all points.

    • waltauvil says:

      Being that guy replying to myself, I note a couple versions change “cocaine” to “perfume from Spain” . . .LOL when 1930s lyrics are “cancelled” by “political correctness” on a Mel Torme recording. 🙂

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