The 60’s Are Back

Am I the only one who thinks McCain is actually being electorally smart about this? Not foreign-policy smart, of course, not real-world smart, not the kind of smart that would actually do anything, but the kind of smart that would get him votes?

“Russian President Medvedev and Prime Minister Putin must understand the severe, long-term negative consequences that their government’s actions will have for Russia’s relationship with the U.S. and Europe,” McCain said.

And, describing the Russian assaults that have gone beyond the disputed territory and into sovereign Georgia as “Moscow’s path of violent aggression,” the GOP nominee suggested that Putin’s aim may be to overthrow the pro-U.S. government in Georgia.

“This should be unacceptable to all the democratic countries of the world, and should draw us together in universal condemnation of Russian aggression,” McCain said.

He’s giving people a familiar enemy, one that we’ve been told over the past couple decades it’s okay to kind of trust now, to like, to visit, to look into the soul of, but one that probably a lot of people remember from their childhoods as The Big Bad, the one that was gonna infiltrate and spy on and undermine and eventually nuke us all to shit. I mean, it’s got a ready-made script for hating on, Russia does, all the jokes are still there, they might need freshening up a bit but they’re there. Hell, the TV shows are probably still on re-runs on Sunday mornings. Fire up the Red Menace machine again, after you’ve dusted it off.

A.

11 thoughts on “The 60’s Are Back

  1. Sure, that’s the strategy. Bring on the commie/czarist menace. But the time for that kind of cold war mongering isn’t in the middle of two hot wars with the islamofascist menace. Even though people have been temporarily lulled into kinda thinking the Iraq war is over–all this debating about timelines simply leaves the rubes with the notion that the whole thing is more or less over whoever gets into the white house in January–still people are aware that we already have troops out there, stretched to the max, on two fronts.
    Plus the georgia thing reads somewhat differently. I’m sure that very few people grasp that South Ossetia started everything by seceding, and I’m sure that there are people who hear McCain tub thumping about war, by jingo, and hear “georgia? they invaded south of the mason dixon?” but a hell of a lot of other people, indpendents, money makers, big money republicans know for a fact we can’t go to war again. McCain is appealing to the know nothing base but I wouldn’t be surprised if he doensn’t lose the remaining technological and market based right wing money. He’ll never lose the ahmandsons and the other rich nutcases but he ‘ll lose the stockbrokers and maybe even some of the network/media money that has been backing him. Rupert murdoch, for one, is no fool and he is not going to be charmed to be working with a lose cannon like McCain. He knows, or suspects, that democrats, in the end, will be just as easily bought as republicans and at least they aren’t threatening to blow up the world every five seconds.
    aimai

  2. As usual the press is ignoring the story behind the story in Georgia. I’m so old my memory aint what it used to be, but I can easily recall that Bush has been salivating over getting the former USSR mini-states enrolled into NATO. These are states right on the border of Russia. He got Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania into NATO, but failed in his attempt to get Georgia into NATO. Georgia’s president is a neocon wannabe, and Georgia actually had armed forces in Iraq. The US military is in Georgia training the Georgia army.
    Most of us (I hope) were aware that Russia doesn’t tolerate having potential enemy states snuggled up on their borders. So, it was inevitable that Russia would take some sort of corrective action. Then, probably at the urging of the neocons, Georgia sent their military into those two mini-mini-states that seceded from Georgia (with Russia’s help). That triggered the Russian invasion of Georgia.
    If wonder boy Bush had succeeded in getting Georgia into NATO, we would now be at war with Russia – remember, that’s Russia, with the masses of nuclear armed missiles aimed at us.
    Of course, by reading your daily paper, you would never read a word about any of this. Can’t have an informed electorate, now can we?

  3. really, it’s all he’s got, once a definite timeline takes Iraq off the table. in all things, he’s the tough guy.

  4. I don’t know if it works demographically. The Berlin Wall fell in 1989 so that means voters aged 36 and younger have never voted in an election with an Iron Curtain. The Cuban Missile Crisis was the last real moment of emotional tension with the Soviets and that is 46 years ago. Hawks are hawks and already solidly in McCain’s camp. If he pushed the Russian bear line too hard I think it makes him appear backwards looking. Russia’s power comes from oil and gas, not communism. If Obama can explain that in a sentence or two then McCain is really going to look like he’s fighting ghosts.

  5. I could be way off base, but I think Obama’s best strategy in response to this is, “This is the kind of rhetoric that got us into this situation. Yes, we need to be strong. But we *also* need to be smart. Do you really want John McCain to get us into a war with Russia? You think gas prices are bad *now*?”

  6. I agree with joejoejoe: I’m 33 and I can’t fathom why people used to be so scared of the Soviet Union, because it was blatantly obvious to me that they were a complete paper tiger. You know, there were always two contradictory lines of propaganda we got fed about the USSR, the first being that they were scary and high-tech and had this invincible army and were coming with their mighty war machine to smash us all in our beds, but at the same time, we were getting shown footage of people standing in kilometre long lines waiting for toilet paper and bread, and constantly told over and over again how poverty-stricken and resource-poor the Soviet Union was, and how this was what would happen to us if we didn’t wholeheartedly embrace Reaganite Capitalism™.
    Both of those things cannot simultaneously be true — a poverty-stricken, resource-poor country cannot afford to run a war machine for very long. When I decided which one I was going to believe, I went with the premise I actually had evidence for, that the Soviet Union really was poor and decaying from within. I figured that if the government (and the US in particular) was willing to lie to the western world about everything else, they were probably just ginning us up about the USSR to keep us afraid and compliant.
    That was why, in 1989, at the tender age of 14, I was about the least surprised person on Earth when the Soviet Union collapsed.
    I still don’t think they’re as much of a threat as the Cold Warriors in the White House want us to believe, because there was no Marshall Plan (and why not?) when the USSR collapsed, to rebuild Russia and its satellite states into functioning economies.
    Why not? The US couldn’t possibly bring itself to actually help a country it had been training itself to hate for the last 80 years, and besides, they had to make Russia safe for the fascists. The best way of doing that is to let a country slide into anarchy so that the kleptocrats can take over. And now that they have, they’ve been sucking vast amounts of money out of the country into their own pockets, so I’m not sure that Russia actually could do all that much even if it wanted to.

  7. Hoppy – thank you so much for your comment. All I’ve seen is the MSM pictures of Russian tanks. I’ve seen the sabre rattling. And I’ve seen the Danon Yogurt commercials of how people live longer in Georgia because they ate yogurt.
    Could Georgia have attacked the ethnic areas to provoke Russia – perhaps at the request of USA or Israel?(absolutely not implying ethnic cleansing, of course). Could a major oil pipline go through Georgia?
    In a similar vein, Finland lost the Karelian district to Russia as part of WWII (the Winter War and War of Continuance). A few years, when a Finnish General was asked if Finland wanted the area back, the General replied that if the bear is sleeping, why kick it.
    I’m also struck by the recent Bush interview where he opined that he is amazed that while they are in an Olympic games of peace, that war has broken out. He seemed amazed at this deep thought. Plato, he ain’t

  8. I can’t fathom why people used to be so scared of the Soviet Union be4cuase we were conditioned to be scared of the soviet union. It’s not so much the USSR but the nukes, that we feared. (and should still in many ways) It may be hard to grasp the way it felt with the benefit of hindsight.
    was willing to lie to the western world about everything else, they were probably just ginning us up about the USSR to keep us afraid and compliant. sounds like the threat of islamofacsim huh?
    The best way of doing that is to let a country slide into anarchy so that the kleptocrats can take over. And now that they have, they’ve been sucking vast amounts of money out of the country into their own pockets, so I’m not sure that Russia actually could do all that much even if it wanted to. Sounds like America!
    Heck of job George!

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