Microwaving Iraq

From Holden:

Jesus, the Bush Administration seems intent on inventing a whole new category of war crimes. William Thomas investigates the U.S. military’s experiments with microwave weaponry in Iraq.

On the rooftop of a shrapnel-pocked building in the ruins of Fallujah, a team of GI’s stealthily sets up a gray plastic dome about two-feet in diameter. Keeping well back from the sight lines of the street and nearby buildings, they plug the cable connectors on the side of the “popper” into a power unit. The grunts have no clue what the device does. They are just following orders.

[snip]

After powering up the unit, the grunts quickly exit the area. It is their commanders, fervent hope that any male survivors enraged by brutal American bombardments that damaged virtually every building in this once thriving “City of Mosques”, displacing a quarter-million residents while murdering thousands of children, women and elders in their homes — will lose all incentive for further resistance and revenge.

[snip]

There are “at least 25 of these that have been deployed to theater, and used. Some have conked out and been removed, so I do not know how many are currently active and broadcasting.”

[snip]

He [the author’s informant, “Hank”] is concerned that innocent Iraqi families and unsuspecting GIs alike are being used as test subjects for a new generation of “psychotronic” weapons using invisible beams across the entire electromagnetic spectrum to selectively alter moods, behavior and bodily processes.

“The “poppers, are capable of using a combo of ULF, VLF, UHF and EHF wavelengths in any combination at the same time, sometimes using one as a carrier wave for the others,” Hank explains, in a process called superheterodyning. The silent frequencies daily sweeping Fallujah and other trouble spots are the same Navy “freqs that drove whales nuts and made them go astray onto beaches.”

[snip]

Clinical tests have repeatedly shown how microwaves “rev up” incipient cancer cells several hundred times. Triggered by nuclear radiation, and turned rogue by electromagnetic warfare unleashed by US forces, human cancer cells have been found to continue proliferating wildly — even after the power source is turned off

[snip]

A preview of what lies in store for long-suffering families in Iraq can be gleaned from Greenham Common, where the British Army reportedly used an electromagnetic weapon against 30,000 women who had camped for nearly two decades around that UK military base to protest the deployment of nuclear-tipped US cruise missiles.

One day in the summer of 1984, more than 2,000 British troops suddenly pulled back, leaving the fence unguarded. Peace mom Kim Besley recalls that as curious women approached the gate, they “started experiencing odd health effects: swollen tongues, changed heartbeats, immobility, feelings of terror, pains in the upper body.”

Besley found her 30-year-old daughter too ill to stand. Other symptoms typical of electromagnetic exposure included skin burns, severe headaches, drowsiness, post-menopausal menstrual bleeding and menstruation at abnormal times. Besley’s daughter’s cycle changed to 14 days and took a year to return to normal.

[snip]

According to members of Hank’s former unit, constant exposure to invisible emissions from radar and radio rigs — as well as to their own microwave weapons — is backfiring. “Our people are driven nuts,” Hank says. “It makes them stupid for two or three days.”

The Desert Storm veteran compared the emotional effects of constant exposure to military microwaves to a lingering low-pressure weather system that never goes away. “You feel way down for days at a time,” he emphasizes

As a consequence, AWOL rates among “spaced out” US troops are as high as 15%, Hank reports. For many deserters, it is not cowardice or conscience that is causing them to absent themselves from duty. “They are feeling so depressed,” Hank explains. “They don’t feel good. So they leave.”

According to Hank’s front-line buddies, Iraqis exposed to secret beam weapons “get laid back, confused and mellow, and then blast out in a rage, as opposed to our folks going on what could only be called a “bender” and turning into a mean drunk for a while.”

Once they wander away from direct electromagnetic-fire, startled GIs come to their senses. They return to their units, Hank explains, saying, “What was I thinking?”

The recovery rate among US troops “seems to be about a day or so, where the locals are not getting over it in less than a week or more on average,” Hank has learned.